ENGL

There are 39 courses in this subject. View all course listings.
ENGL 100
3.00 cr.
Stretch Composition I

Through a variety of writing assignments, students develop effective writing processes, gain critical reading skills, represent and respond to others' ideas, reflect on their writing growth, and generate polished, reader-based prose.

ENGL 101
3.00 cr.
Stretch Composition II

This course helps students develop flexibile writing processes, increase rhetorical awareness, acquire critical reading skills to support their writing, implement effective reserach techniques, represent others' ideas in multiple ways, reflect on their writing development, and polish their work. Prerequisites: ENGL100 and consent of instructor.

ENGL 102
1.00 cr.
English Practicum, Literary Magazine

Students obtain practical experience working as part of a literary magazine staff. Staff duties range from editing and designing magazine layout to organizing literary activities and maintaining a digital presence. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

ENGL 110
3.00 cr.
College Writing I

Students learn strategies that promote critical, creative, and collaborative drafting, and practice college level writing in narrative, critical, and persuasive forms. Students produce a portfolio of several essays, including a research paper.

ENGL 200
3.00 cr.
Literary Analysis

This course introduces students to the analytical tools they need in order to read and write about literary texts: use of literary terminology, practice of strategies used in discussing and writing about literature, including conducting literary research and familiarization with the conventions for citation and bibliography in the field. Completion of ENGL200 no later than fall semester of the sophomore year is strongly recommended for English majors/minors.

ENGL 201
3.00 cr.
Survey of Greek Classical Literature

This course examines Greek mythology and literature, including its influence on Roman literature in particular and Western literature in general. Genres include fables, drama, and epics.

ENGL 202
3.00 cr.
Roman Literature

This course examines the influence of ancient Greek culture on literature from the Roman Empire. Students are introduced to the origins and growth of the Roman Empire and its texts.

ENGL 203
3.00 cr.
Ages of British Literature

This course begins with the influence of the Roman Empire on British Literature. Students examine the development of Old, Middle, and Early Modern English through <i>Beowulf</i>, Chaucer, and Shakespeare, respectively. Students are also introduced to the Arthurian legend. The course includes short stories, drama, and poetry from the period of Modern English.

ENGL 204
3.00 cr.
Modern European Literature

Students study a selection of major European authors from the late 18th century through the 21st century. A particular emphasis is placed on the literary movement Modernism, its responses to late Enlightenment thought, and its influence on postmodern sensibilities and practices in the arts.

ENGL 205
3.00 cr.
Introduction to Fiction

This course introduces literary terminology commonly used in analyzing short stories and novels. British and American literature is selected from the 19th through the 21st centuries.

ENGL 206
3.00 cr.
Introduction to Poetry and Drama

This course introduces literary terminology commonly used in analyzing various types of poetry and drama. Poetry is traced from its Old English origins, and Western drama from its ancient Greek origins.

ENGL 210
3.00 cr.
College Writing II

Students examine and practice advanced techniques, individual and collaborative, for generating ethical, audience-oriented prose. Each student develops a specialized portfolio corresponding with individual academic goals.

ENGL 211
3.00 cr.
American Literature I

Readings in American literature from the colonial period to the Civil War: poetry, philosophy, novel, short story, and other prose are read and discussed; historical, social, and cultural contexts are considered in relation to the primary texts. Special attention is given to major literary movements of the period.

ENGL 212
3.00 cr.
American Literature II

Readings in American literature from the post-Civil War period to the present day: drama, novel, short story, and other prose are read and discussed; historical, social, and cultural contexts are considered in relation to the primary texts. Special attention is given to major literary movements of the period.

ENGL 213
3.00 cr.
Creative Writing

Through regular writing to generate ideas and practice techniques, students fathom the creative process as they are led from exploring personal experience to transforming such experience into artful fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction. Prerequisite: ENGL110.

ENGL 220
3.00 cr.
World Literature

Students study a selection of major world authors from outside the traditional Western literary canon, especially from African, Asian, and Caribbean cultures. Primary focus is given to contemporary works, and students apply different theoretical perspectives to the texts studied.

ENGL 230
3.00 cr.
Introduction to Contemporary Literature

Students read and examine fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction from the contemporary era. Emphasis is placed on concerns, questions, and aesthetic sensibilities that help define and explain recent literature.

ENGL 302
1.00 cr.
Advanced English Practicum,Literary Magazine

Building on skills acquired in ENGL102, this course provides students with advanced work on the literary magazine. Previous credits in ENGL102 are strongly preferred. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

ENGL 312
3.00 cr.
Reading as Writers Across Media

Students examine and practice the craft and technique of textual production. Technical elements of narrative and story, such as style, voice, story-arc, character development, dialogue, image, plotting, and tone are studied and practiced. Traditional literary genres as well as texts in visual, electronic, and new media are included.

ENGL 313
3.00 cr.
Advanced Writing

This course provides students with an in-depth focus on an approved single genre. The course also requires a significant portfolio of work to be developed. May be taken twice with different content. Prerequisite: ENGL 210 or ENGL 213.

ENGL 314
3.00 cr.
Literary Production

Through reading, writing, and discussion, students examine the concept of literariness and produce texts of literary merit. Students also explore the ways literature is supported, distributed, and accessed throughout various communities.

ENGL 317
3.00 cr.
Composition Studies

Theories and principles of rhetoric, composition and writing, and language as they apply to the teaching of composition. This course is required for English Secondary Licensure but is applicable to all students interested in writing. Prerequisite: ENGL210 or ENGL213.

ENGL 320
3.00 cr.
The English Language

Focusing on both the history of the English language and its structure and form, this course emphasizes grammar, phonology, syntax, and semantics. Students also examine prescriptive and descriptive linguistics, with an emphasis on the history and use of <i>The Oxford English Dictionary</i>.

ENGL 321
3.00 cr.
Shakespeare

Students study William Shakespeare's dramatic and poetic works in the context of Elizabethan and Jacobean cultures, as well as their literary origins. This course includes an examination of Shakespearean scholarship and Shakespeare's influence on later authors.

ENGL 322
3.00 cr.
British Literature: 17th and 18th Centuries

Based on a selection of Renaissance, Restoration, and later Neoclassic authors, students read, analyze, and discuss works by dramatists, poets, and novelists, with particular attention to the development of the English novel.

ENGL 323
3.00 cr.
British Literature: Early Romantics and Victorians

This course begins with early Romantic poets and continues with selected Victorian poets and novelists, with emphasis placed on the historical, intellectual, and social influences on authors across generations. The authors and literature in this course differ from the authors and literature in ENGL324. Students may take both ENGL323 and ENGL324.

ENGL 324
3.00 cr.
British Literature: Later Romantics and Victorians

This course begins with later Romantic poets and continues with selected Victorian poets and novelists, with emphasis placed on the historical, intellectual, and social influences on authors across generations. The authors and literature in this course differ from the authors and literature in ENGL323. Students may take both ENGL324 and ENGL323.

ENGL 327
3.00 cr.
Young Adult and Classic Literature

A survey of young adult literature, through the 21st century, with an emphasis on its relationship to classic literature. Genres include fiction, poetry, and drama.

ENGL 331
3.00 cr.
Early American Authors

This course focuses on major American authors from the colonial period to the Civil War. Nonfiction, fiction, and poetry by representative authors are read and discussed in light of the historical, social, and cultural contexts informing their works. The course considers how their works continue to inform conceptions of the American self, place, and project.

ENGL 332
3.00 cr.
Modern American Authors

This course focuses on American authors from the Civil War to the present day. Nonfiction, fiction, and poetry by representative authors are read and discussed in light of the national and international contexts informing their works. The course considers how their works reflect and revise early conceptions of the American self, place, and project.

ENGL 335
3.00 cr.
African-American Literature

Students study the African-American literary, philosophical, and intellectual tradition, with special attention to how cultural forms, practices, and ideology inform the expressive modes and textual productions of African-Americans from the 18th century to the present.

ENGL 350
3.00 cr.
Literary Theory

This course provides an in-depth study of the development of literary theories, interpretive methods, and debates about the value and role of texts from ancient times to the present.

ENGL 360
3.00 cr.
Poetry: 20th and 21st Centuries

A survey of modern British and American poetry, including dramatic, narrative, fictional, and lyrical forms.

ENGL 370
3.00 cr.
Christian Writers

Students survey Christian writers from the 2nd century through the 20th century. Authors include Augustine of Hippo, Bede, Thomas Aquinas, Martin Luther, John Bunyan, G.K. Chesterton, T.S. Eliot, J.R.R. Tolkien, and C.S. Lewis. Genres include nonfiction, fiction, poetry, and drama.

ENGL 444
3.00 cr.
Methods in Teaching 5-12 Communication Arts and Literature

This course is required for students who seek state licensure (grades K-12) for teaching of Communication Arts/Language within the English Department's Minnesota Teaching Licensure track. The course includes a field experience and must precede EDUC495 "Student Teaching I" and EDUC497 "Student Teaching II". Prerequisites: Acceptance to English major's Minnesota Teaching Licensure track and acceptance to education major.

ENGL 480
3.00 cr.
Topics in Literature and Language

Topics vary and typically provide students with an investigation of specific literary themes, movements, authors, styles, or genres, thereby allowing students to experience depth in a specialized area of literature. Students may take this course twice with different content.

ENGL 493
1.50 cr.
Senior Seminar I

In ENGL493, the first semester of a year-long senior capstone course in English, students review writing, documentation, and research conventions specific to analyses and creations of texts; identify broad topics for their senior theses; and consider their developing projects and interests in relation to the discipline of English (textual studies). Prerequisites: ENGL200 and either ENGL210 or ENGL213. The completion of ENGL320 and ENGL350 prior to enrollment in senior seminar is strongly recommended.

ENGL 494
1.50 cr.
Senior Seminar II

In ENGL494, the second semester of a year-long senior capstone course in English, students pursue research guided by topics identified in ENGL493; produce a literature review; narrow topics for their senior theses; participate in peer workshops and conferences with the instructor; produce a rigorous, substantive thesis; and publicly present their finished work. Prerequisites: ENGL200 and either ENGL210 or ENGL213. The completion of ENGL320 and ENGL350 prior to enrollment in senior seminar is strongly recommended.

ENGL 499
3.00 cr.
English Internship

Students who qualify for an English internship actively participate in an individualized field experience relevant to the English major. A proposal is made by the student on an Internship Program Learning Contract, which requires the approval of the student's faculty advisor and the site supervisor. The student goals and outcomes are assessed by both the site supervisor and the student's advisor, for a letter grade. Prerequisite: Only juniors and seniors majoring in English and in good standing are eligible for the internship.