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ENGL - English Courses

There are 35 courses in this subject. View all course listings.
ENGL 102
1.00 cr.
English Practicum, Literary Magazine

Practical experience in editing creative works and designing layout for two or more issues of the college literary magazine. Prerequisite: consent of advisor required.

ENGL 110
3.00 cr.
College Writing I

While learning strategies that promote critical, creative, and collaborative drafting, students practice college level writing in narrative, critical, and persuasive forms, producing a portfolio of five to seven essays including a research paper.

ENGL 200
3.00 cr.
Literary Studies

This course introduces students to the analytical tools they need in order to read and write about literary texts: use of literary terminology, practice of strategies used in discussing and writing about literature, including conducting literary research and familiarization with the conventions for citation and bibliography in the field. Completion of ENGL200 no later than fall semester of the sophomore year is strongly recommended for English majors/minors.

ENGL 201
3.00 cr.
Classical Greek Literature

This course explores the relationships among ancient Greek mythology, history, geography, literature, and philosophy. Terms of literary and philosophical analysis are applied to texts and individual research. Authors include Homer, Plato, Sophocles, and other dramatists.

ENGL 202
3.00 cr.
Roman Literature

This course examines the influence of ancient Greek mythology, literature, and philosophy on fictional and nonfictional texts from the Roman Empire. Students are introduced to the origins and growth of the Roman Empire, including the introduction of Christianity and its influence. Terms of literary and philosophical analysis are applied to works by Lucretius, Virgil, and dramatists.

ENGL 203
3.00 cr.
Anglo-Saxon, Medieval, and Renaissance British Literature

This course begins with the influence of the Roman Empire on historical texts from Britain. The development of Old, Middle, and Early Modern English is examined, in part, through <i>Beowulf</i>, Chaucer, and Shakespeare, respectively. Students are also introduced to the Arthurian legend and its influence on authors across generations.

ENGL 204
3.00 cr.
Modern European Literature

This course examines the philosophical, political, and literary texts produced in Europe during the 18th through the 20th centuries. Terms of literary and philosophical analysis are applied to works by figures like Voltaire, Rousseau, Hegel, Marx, Freud, Kafka, and Camus.

ENGL 205
3.00 cr.
Introduction to Fiction

This course introduces literary terminology commonly used in discussing and writing about short stories and novels. British and American literature is selected from the 19th through the 21st centuries. Emphasis is placed on relationships between authors' lives and their fiction, as well as individual works of fiction that have influenced other authors' fiction.

ENGL 206
3.00 cr.
Introduction to Poetry and Drama

This course introduces literary terminology commonly used in discussing and writing about British and American poetry, and Western drama. Poetry is traced from its Old English origins, and Western drama from its ancient Greek Origins.

ENGL 210
3.00 cr.
College Writing II

Students examine and practice advanced techniques, individual and collaborative, for generating ethical, audience-oriented prose. Each student develops a specialized portfolio corresponding with individual academic goals.

ENGL 211
3.00 cr.
American Literature I

Readings in American literature from the colonial period to the Civil War: poetry, philosophy, novel, short story, and other prose are read and discussed; historical, social, and cultural contexts are considered in relation to the primary texts. Special attention will be given to major literary movements of the period.

ENGL 212
3.00 cr.
American Literature II

Readings in American literature from the post-Civil War period to the present day: drama, novel, short story, and other prose are read and discussed; historical, social, and cultural contexts are considered in relation to the primary texts. Special attention will be given to major literary movements of the period.

ENGL 213
3.00 cr.
Creative Writing

Through regular writing to generate ideas and practice techniques, students fathom the creative process as they are led from exploring personal experience to transforming such experience into artful fiction, poetry, and creative non-fiction. Prerequisite: ENGL110.

ENGL 220
3.00 cr.
Non-Western Literature

The study of a selection of major world authors from outside the traditional Western literary canon, especially from Africa, Asia, and Eastern European cultures. Primary focus will be given to contemporary works and students will apply different theoretical perspectives to the texts studied.

ENGL 302
1.00 cr.
Advanced Journalism Practicum, Literary Magazine

Advanced work on the literary magazine for students with four previous credits in ENGL102.

ENGL 305
3.00 cr.
British Literature: Romantics and Victorians

Reading, analysis, and discussion of works by selected Romantic and Victorian poets and novelists, with attention to the historical, intellectual, and social influences on writers across generations.

ENGL 312
3.00 cr.
Reading as Writers Across Media

Students examine and practice the craft and technique of textual production. Technical elements of narrative and story, such as style, voice, story-arc, character development, dialogue, image, plotting, and tone will be studied and practiced. Traditional literary genres as well as texts in visual, electronic, and new media will be included.

ENGL 313
3.00 cr.
Advanced Writing

A course challenging students to choose one or two genres to focus on in some depth. The course also requires a significant portfolio of work to be developed. May be taken twice with different content. Prerequisite: ENGL210 or ENGL213.

ENGL 317
3.00 cr.
Composition Theory and Practice

Theories and principles of rhetoric, composition and writing, and language as they apply to the teaching of composition. This course is required for English Secondary Licensure but is applicable to all students interested in writing. Prerequisite: ENGL210 or ENGL213.

ENGL 320
3.00 cr.
The English Language

A study of both the history of the English language and its structure and form, including grammar, phonology, syntax, and semantics. This course includes an examination of prescriptive and descriptive linguistics, with an emphasis on the history and use of <i>The Oxford English Dictionary</i>.

ENGL 321
3.00 cr.
Shakespeare

The study of William Shakespeare's dramatic and poetic works in the context of Elizabethan and Jacobean cultures, as well as their literary origins. This course includes an examination of Shakespearean scholarship and Shakespeare's influence on later authors.

ENGL 322
3.00 cr.
British Literature: 17th and 18th Centuries

Reading, analysis, and discussion of works by selected writers from the metaphysical poets, Bunyan, Defoe, Swift, Blake, and many others, with attention to the historical, intellectual, and social influences and to the major literary movements that still influence authors today.

ENGL 323
3.00 cr.
British Literature: Early Romantics and Victorians

Reading, analysis, and discussion of works by selected Romantic and Victorian poets and novelists, with attention to the historical, intellectual, and social influences on authors across generations. This course's poems and novels are not included in ENGL324.

ENGL 324
3.00 cr.
British Literature: Later Romantics and Victorians

Reading, analysis, and discussion of works by selected later Romantic and Victorian poets and novelists, with attention to the historical, intellectual, and social influences on authors across generations. This course's poems and novels are not included in ENGL323.

ENGL 327
3.00 cr.
Young Adult and Classic Literature

A survey of young adult literature, through the 21st century, with an emphasis on its relationship to classic literature. Genres include fiction, poetry, and drama.

ENGL 335
3.00 cr.
African-American Literature

Study of the African-American literary, philosophical, and intellectual tradition, with special attention to cultural forms, practices, and ideology as these inform the expressive modes and textual productions of African Americans from the 18th century to present day.

ENGL 350
3.00 cr.
Literary Theory

A study of the development of literary theories and interpretive methods and debates about the value and role of texts from ancient times to the present.

ENGL 360
3.00 cr.
Poetry: 20th and 21st Centuries

A survey of British and American poetry, including dramatic, narrative, fictional, and lyrical forms.

ENGL 362
3.00 cr.
Social Media Communication

Communication, through the use of social media, has become an integral part of human interaction. The ability to understand the influences of the various forms of social media and how to use them effectively are important aspects of communication competence. Primary goals of this course are to improve students' oral and written communication when interacting with social media, and for students to understand the ethical implications of social media. (Cross listed with COMM362.)

ENGL 370
3.00 cr.
Christian Writers

An overview of some of the outstanding Christian writers from St. Augustine to C.S. Lewis, including fiction, nonfiction, and poetry.

ENGL 444
3.00 cr.
Methods in Teaching 5-12 Communication Arts and Literature

This course is required for students who seek state licensure for grades 5-12 teaching of Communication Arts and Literature within the English major. Students must first meet all requirements for "Entry into the Education Major." They must also meet all requirements for the English "Entry into the Major." This course contains a field experience component and must precede enrollment in EDUC495/496: Teaching Internships and Seminars (student teaching).

ENGL 480
3.00 cr.
Topics in Literature and Language

An investigation of specific literary themes, movements, authors, styles, or forms, allowing students a chance to experience depth in a specialized area of literature. May be taken twice with different content.

ENGL 493
1.50 cr.
Senior Seminar I

In ENGL493, the first semester of a year-long senior capstone course in English, students review writing, documentation, and research conventions specific to analyses and creations of texts, identify broad topics for their senior theses, and consider their developing projects and interests in relation to the discipline of English (textual studies). Prerequisites: ENGL200 and either ENGL210 or ENGL213. The completion of ENGL320 and ENGL350 prior to enrollment in senior seminar is strongly recommended.

ENGL 494
1.50 cr.
Senior Seminar II

In ENGL494, the second semester of a year-long senior capstone course in English, students pursue research guided by topics identified in ENGL493, produce a literature review, narrow topics for their senior theses, participate in peer workshops, one-on-one conferencing with the faculty instructor, produce a rigorous, substantive thesis, and publicly present their finished work. Prerequisites: ENGL200 and either ENGL210 or ENGL213. The completion of ENGL320 and ENGL350 prior to enrollment in senior seminar is strongly recommended.

ENGL 499
3.00 cr.
English Internship

An individualized field experience relevant to the English major, proposed by the student on an Internship Program Learning Contract, and requiring the approval of the student's faculty advisor and the site supervisor. The student goals and outcomes are assessed by both the Site Supervisor and the student's advisor, for a letter grade. Prerequisite: Only juniors and seniors majoring in English in good standing are eligible for the internship.